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Brave Up and Get Your Shots: It Could Save Your Life

Posted by on Aug 1, 2016

shots-Blog_400_braveup_oFew of us think much about vaccinations. But their value was made starkly clear in a Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report released last year (August 28, 2015) by the CDC. The report stated that childhood vaccinations given from 1994 through 2013 (a 20-year period) in the United States will be preventing 732,000 early deaths, in addition to preventing an estimated 322 million illnesses and 21 million hospitalizations. In total, they figured vaccinations had saved an estimated $1.38 trillion in net healthcare costs.

Although childhood vaccinations are the main focus here, shots recommended for adults are just as important – and becoming more so due to aging populations. Because SoFHA’s physicians support the CDC’s recommendations for all ages, we are providing a quick rundown below of immunizations recommended for adults at different ages. If you want to learn more about childhood vaccinations, review the Parents’ Guide to Childhood Immunizations provided online by the CDC.

All Adults

  • Flu vaccine (annually)
  • Tdap vaccine (tetanus, diphtheria, whooping cough) (If not administered during childhood, get the Tdap once, then get a tetanus/diphtheria booster [known as Td] every 10 years.)
  • Women should get the Tdap vaccine again with each pregnancy, preferably between the 27th through 36th week.

Adults 19 to 26 Years Old

  • Flu vaccine (annually)
  • Tdap vaccine (tetanus, diphtheria, whooping cough) (If not administered during childhood, get the Tdap once, then get a tetanus/diphtheria booster [known as Td] every 10 years.)
  • HPV vaccine (protects against the human papillomaviruses)

Adults 60 Years and Older

  • Flu vaccine (annually)
  • TD or Tdap vaccine
  • Pneumococcal vaccines, which protect against pneumonia, infection of the blood, middle-ear infection and bacterial meningitis. (One dose of PCV13 is recommended for all adults 65 years of age or older who haven’t previously gotten the vaccine, followed by a dose of PPSV23 6 to 12 months later.)
  • Shingles Vaccine

To get more specific information about each age category, go to “What Vaccines are Recommended for You” posted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Other Vaccinations Might Be Needed

You should be aware that some adults may require additional immunizations besides those listed – based on personal health conditions, what they do on their jobs, school-related requirements or other factors. To confirm you’re adequately covered, talk with your SoFHA physician and get a comprehensive list of the vaccines you personally need for illness prevention.

If you plan to travel or are planning on visiting or living abroad, go to Travel Smart: Get Vaccinated.